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Author Topic: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites  (Read 10819 times)

Offline TEROS7776

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #15 on: Fri Jun 01 2012 01 45 PM »
As most of us know, Delta2 nest lost an eaglet today, cause unknown at this time.  If anyone is interested in reading David Hancock's comments regarding this issue, the following is a link to their Forum. 

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?showtopic=372547

The loss of Goldwing is very sad and I know we are all affected.  Goldwing is soaring with Phoenix, Hornby Echo and the many other young birds that have gone before.
"The depth, breadth and longevity of your grief are not a reflection of how much you cared about a person you lost." Dr. Phil McGraw  (all photographs courtesy of Hancock Wildlife and Wild Earth)

Offline wieaglewatcher

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #16 on: Sat Jun 02 2012 10 38 PM »
Thank you Teros for the post. It is very interesting but also sad..... :cryhanky[1]:

Offline BostonEbird

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #17 on: Tue Jun 18 2013 04 00 AM »
Q. Do bald eagles have the same digestive system as humans do?

Answer Contributed by Eagle Expert Peter Nye


A. Now there's an interesting question! The answer is, no. Birds in general have a higher metabolic rate than we do, which demands that they "process" their food as quickly as possible. This means getting it into a form from which they can extract the energy they need, quickly and efficiently. Birds, including eagles, have adaptations for doing this. Most importantly, part of their stomach has turned into a "gizzard", which we don't have, in which food is ground down to a fine consistency to permit rapid digestion. In eagles, this is also the place where "pellets" are formed. These are masses of material from prey that cannot be digested, such as fur, feathers, and occasionally bone, that then travel backwards from the gizzard up to the mouth and are cast (like vomited) out the mouth. Depending on what they have eaten, pellets are formed after the meal, overnight, and are usually cast out the next morning. Most fish are digested completely. Eagles have very strong stomach acids, and can digest bone quite well, which aids them in their own bone formation and in their egg-shell formation. Another major difference is that eagles (and other birds) have something called a "crop", in the upper alimentary track (esophagus) where food can be stored for days. This is extremely beneficial to eagles, who can store up to two pounds of food in their crop when prey is abundant, so they can then go without food for several days if need be. There are more differences, but these are two of the major ones.

She flys the sky like an Eagle in the eye of a Hurricane.

Offline MassNoregon

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #18 on: Fri Jun 13 2014 07 08 AM »
  HWF ~ Frequently Asked Questions About the Bald Eagle Link.

http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?showtopic=949 

This is on Branching & Fledging:
 How long do the nestlings stay in the nest? When do they learn to fly?
Eaglets stay in the nest and are fed by their parents for 12 to 14 weeks. They practice flapping their wings and hopping in the nest, often jumping up to other branches, called branching, close to their nest. After days or weeks of jumping, flapping and branching, they fly off the nest. This first flight is called “fledging.”

   

Offline MassNoregon

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #19 on: Sat Jul 26 2014 01 00 PM »

White Rock Eagle Nest and tree map WA camera view.  Revised

This map was produced by Florida2watcher

White Rock chatters Bonnieb2 , BlueJay2011 , Huskerlady (Kathy) and BostonEbird helped with the tree and branch names.



The original Scap used for this map was taken by Starwolf535
All WR - S'caps  Copyright © Wild Earth & HWF

Offline BostonEbird

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #20 on: Mon Nov 17 2014 07 45 AM »
A picture comparing eggs , by Jodi NAimo  : 

She flys the sky like an Eagle in the eye of a Hurricane.

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #21 on: Tue Jan 20 2015 09 06 AM »
Reproduction facts for Bald Eagles:
Mating season: Anywhere from late September to early April, depending on the region.
Gestation: The female lays her first egg 5-10 days after mating. The second egg usually appears within 36 to 72 hours after the
first. The eggs are incubated for about 35 to 39 days.
Clutch size: 1-3 eggs.
:egghatch[1]: :egghatch[1]: :egghatch[1]:
When the eaglet inside the egg makes the first hole into the egg, it is called a PIP. It is a tiny hole that the incubating chick makes with its "egg tooth" (a sharp point at the end of it's beak). Slowly the chick enlarges the hole, until it is big enough for the chick to leave the egg. This process can take up to 24 hours.
« Last Edit: Sun Jan 24 2016 03 18 PM by Bonnieb2 »

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #22 on: Fri Mar 20 2015 06 03 AM »
*Regarding the second egg: Our WR eagle pair this year took from 3/13/15 @4:57p.m. for the first egg, to 3/16/15 @8:18pm for the second egg to arrive. (over 3 hours longer than mentioned in the info above.)
« Last Edit: Sat Mar 21 2015 05 17 AM by Bonnieb2 »

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #23 on: Tue May 05 2015 05 39 AM »
"CROP".... "Eagles have an out pouching of the esophagus, called a crop, where they can store food when the stomach is full. The crop also separates indigestible substances, such as feathers, fur, and scales from the meat.  The indigestible substance is mixed with mucus and formed into a mass. After the meal, the eagle eventually regurgitates the mass as a casting."
This quote borrowed from:  http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/eagle/eagle3.html

« Last Edit: Tue May 05 2015 06 19 AM by Bonnieb2 »

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #24 on: Sun May 24 2015 05 19 AM »
Pin Feathers are new feathers that are in the process of growing. They are at times called blood feathers because they are still connected to the blood supply and this connection is what fuels their growth. After they are fully grown the blood supply retreats and the feather is inert like a fingernail
Borrowed from: http://www.ccbbirds.org/what-we-do/research/species-of-concern/virginia-eagles/facts-about-eagles/
« Last Edit: Sun May 24 2015 05 23 AM by Bonnieb2 »

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #25 on: Sat May 30 2015 07 02 AM »
BRANCHING....... simply means eaglets going back and forth from nest to branches and back to the nest.
It is a behavior common in eaglets just before fledging. In branching, eaglets move from the nest to a branch and flap their wings and jump off the branch. This behavior serves to strengthen flight muscles and acclimate the eaglet to life outside the nest.
Branching is a small hop & lift onto the closest branch.
« Last Edit: Wed Jun 17 2015 06 52 PM by Bonnieb2 »

Offline Bonnieb2

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Re: Interesting Eagle Facts and Links to Websites
« Reply #26 on: Sat Jun 20 2015 08 21 AM »
Fledge....... This is the time when the eaglets feathers and wing muscles are sufficiently developed for flight. This usually occurs around 9
 or 10 weeks of age.